Diversity, Globalization, and Solidarity

Definition Diagrams

Diversity is the existence of differing views on forms, types, ideas, and cultures; one entity composed of different elements. Diversity is both an inevitable and necessary aspect of life, and although this term encompasses all aspects of entities, many associate the term on a social level that includes human beliefs, cultures, and races. Is it solely by what an individual identifies themselves through ethnicity, race and beliefs? It is a natural occurence for people to place themselves within a specific culture, belief, or opinion. Diversity is a significant cause for the growth of societies and civilizations due to the distinct and varied ideas, languages, and beliefs shared amongst people.

Globalization is the growth to a global or worldwide scale, extending to other or all parts of the world. Globalization is the process that allows a group or individual to govern or have power over others in another location. It creates a broader view and understanding of the interconnections between nations and its potential benefits. This is a process of interaction and integration, wanted or unwanted by many with a deeper investigation of its effects and benefits. But how effective and legitimate can this policy be if the different areas have differing beliefs?

Solidarity is the unity or agreement of feeling or action, especially among individuals with a common interest. Solidarity is a strong union amongst individuals due to a common interest or belief. This union goes beyond race and cultures to create a strong unit. This goes far beyond the superficial and more towards experiences that one may have that allow for a common identity. Is it enough for individuals to be bound by a singular common idea without considering the influences in which this idea developed?

References:

Feher, Michel. Nongovernmental Politics. Zone Books, 2007.

Hastings, Leonard. The Politics of the Governed: Reflections on Popular Politics in Most of the World. New York: Columbia University Press, 2006.

Hellwig, Timothy. “Globalization and Perceptions of Policy Maker Competence: Evidence from France.” Political Research Quarterly. no. 1 (2007): 146-149. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4623814 (accessed September 12, 2013).

Maffi, Luisa. “Linguistic, Cultural, and Biological Diversity.” Annual Review of Anthropology. (2005): 602-606. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25064900 (accessed September 12, 2013).

Montgomery, Edmund. “Our Social and Ethical Solidarity.” International Journal of Ethics.Vol. 8, No. 1 (Oct., 1897), pp. 55-73

The World is Not Flat Putting Globalization in its Place Christopherson,Susan.“The World is Not Flat Putting Globalization in its Place.”Cambridge Journal of Regions. (2008). 343- 349. http://cjres.oxfordjournals.org/content/1/3/343.full.pdf+html
Rippe, Klaus Peter. “Diminishing Solidarity.” Ethical Theory and Moral Practice. no. 3 (1998): 364-369. http://www.jstor.org/stable/27504040 (accessed September 12, 2013).

Alexis Cardona and Gabriela Maiza

Alexis Cardona

6 Comments

  1. Globalization is the growth to a global or worldwide scale, extending to other or all parts of the world. Globalization is the process that allows a group or individual to govern or have power over others in another location. It creates a broader view and understanding of the interconnections between nations and its potential benefits. This is a process of interaction and integration, wanted or unwanted by many with a deeper investigation of its effects and benefits. But how effective and legitimate can this policy be if the different areas have differing beliefs?

    Globalization seems to have a connotation of colonization and it’s association with governmental policy in this definition. I think it does often have that effect, but may not necessarily be inherent in the act of globalization. There is often reference to a globalized protest movement, which actively attempts to counteract the effects of governmental globalization (not even sure that’s a good way to describe it). Maybe globalization is just the act of connecting contexts across the globe, rather than solely in referral to economic/governmental globalization. So maybe even sending an email to a different continent could technically be an act of (personal) globalization.

  2. Globalization is the growth to a global or worldwide scale, extending to other or all parts of the world. Globalization is the process that allows a group or individual to govern or have power over others in another location. It creates a broader view and understanding of the interconnections between nations and its potential benefits. This is a process of interaction and integration, wanted or unwanted by many with a deeper investigation of its effects and benefits. But how effective and legitimate can this policy be if the different areas have differing beliefs?

    This definition of globalization seems to assume that globalization is always associated with some form of governmentality. Protest movements are often referred to becoming globalized in their integration to fight the effects of governmental globalization (not even sure if that’s the right term). Maybe globalization as a term solely refers to the connection of contexts across the globe; maybe we need to create sub-categorizations of globalization to differentiate between the many possible meanings?

  3. I view globalization as growth in terms of well a global scale, but mainly on the terms of uniting two or more entities that were once unfamiliar and distant to each other. I believe that right now technology is the greatest proponent of globalization and that it is “shrinking the earth”. For example, for electronics with Skype, the internet and especially Facebook people are able to communicate between each other through instant messaging and emails. The ease of communication and visual aspect of the internet allows you to essentially be in another place from the convenience of your desktop. It allows you to see another country without leaving your microwave dinner.

    In terms of transportation, with now even faster airplanes and trains than before we are able to do in just a few hours what once took days and even months. These elements combined I would argue have tightened the nous around the neck of free peoples who can now be managed and governed by people thousands of miles away. Those who have the power to govern are still in charge of areas and people that they have little or know local knowledge of. So even in this age, with the aid of Globalization, many areas are still being control the same way that the British Empire ruled over its colonies.

  4. Diversity is not inevitable. Many may argue that it is also not necessary. In order to define diversity as either inevitable or necessary, we must first narrow our scope of examination. In terms of biological diversity, biodiversity, it may be argued, commonly so, that this is necessary for a healthy ecosystem, scientifically speaking. However, if we are seeking to grow corn for mass production, diversity may be an enemy, as such genetic diversity may purposely be squelched through the process of bioengineering. Extrapolating to the human, the effect on society of commonly recognized categorizations of human diversity such as cultural, racial, or socio-economic is a matter of heated debate and political agendas.

  5. Globalization is the process that allows a group or individual to govern or have power over others in another location. I would not argue that even though globalization is intricately connected with power and cannot function without proper governance, there were other more essential connections that create the network of globalization. Technology, for instance, as Dan also pointed out, is becoming the new glue that creates interfaces and connections across nations. I would say that globalization is more of the process of interaction and integration, where ideas are shared without the geographic concern of boundaries. Moreover, a share on the common culture across different nations could also form networks that weave globalization, for example, quarters such as China towns, Little Italy, and different national hubs dispersed around the world, in different cities. Cultural infusion such as adding Chinese elements into American cuisine is also another example of a global integration so that power, ruling one over, and benefits are not the only and necessary part of achieving globalization.

  6. Globalization is the process that allows a group or individual to govern or have power over others in another location. I would not argue that even though globalization is intricately connected with power and cannot function without proper governance, there were other more essential connections that create the network of globalization. Technology, for instance, as Dan also pointed out, is becoming the new glue that creates interfaces and connections across nations. I would say that globalization is more of the process of interaction and integration, where ideas are shared without the geographic concern of boundaries. Moreover, a share on the common culture across different nations could also form networks that weave globalization, for example, quarters such as China towns, Little Italy, and different national hubs dispersed around the world, in different cities. Cultural infusion such as adding Chinese elements into American cuisine is also another example of a global integration so that power, ruling one over, and benefits are not the only and necessary part of achieving globalization.

    Kelly Wang

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